FETTY HISTORY
FETTY, FETTY HISTORY, FETTY COAT OF ARMS, GUYENNE FRANCE, ENGLAND, AUSTRIA, NORWAY, AMERICA.
England and France
History of Guyenne, France
Where Fetty - de Feytis was ennobled 1644

Guyenne
also spelled Guienne, former region of southwestern France, merged with Gascony for the last centuries before the French Revolution in the gouvernement of Guyenne and Gascony (Guyenne-et-Gascogne). The Guyenne region corresponds to the modern département of Gironde and to most of the départements of Lot-et-Garonne, Dordogne, Lot, and Aveyron. The region was under English control during much of the later European Middle Ages.

From Roman times until the Middle Ages, the region of Guyenne was simply part of the region of Aquitaine, of which the name Guyenne is a corruption. Historically, the name Guyenne first became important through the Treaty of Paris (1259) between Louis IX of France and Henry III of England. By this treaty, Louis IX accepted Henry III as his vassal for Guyenne and for Gascony, which the English had held previously. (England had received both Aquitaine and Gascony in the 12th century through Henry II's marriage to Eleanor of Aquitaine.) Guyenne was retaken by the French at the beginning of the Hundred Years' War, but the Treaty of Brétigny in 1360 restored it, with the whole of the old Aquitaine, to the English. In the later phases of the Hundred Years' War, France reconquered all these areas. The last attempt by the English to retake the territory was repulsed at the Battle of Castillon (1453).

Louis XI gave the duchy of Guyenne to his brother Charles de France, duke de Berry, in 1469, but, after the latter's death in 1472, it was reunited to the French crown. During the religious wars in the 16th century and during the Fronde in the 17th, Guyenne was the scene of bitter fighting.

Aquitaine région encompassing the départements of Dordogne, Gironde, Landes, Lot-et-Garonne, and Pyrénées-Atlantiques in southwestern France. It is roughly coextensive with the western half of the historical region of Aquitaine. The capital is Bordeaux.

In Julius Caesar's description of Gaul, “Aquitania” was an area extending from the Pyrenees to the Garonne River. The Roman emperor Augustus (reigned 27 BC–AD 14) made it a Roman administrative district, and its borders were extended as far north as the Loire River and east to the Massif Central.

A Visigothic province in the 5th century, Aquitaine came under Frankish rule in the 6th century, retaining a measure of provincial identity exploited by local rulers. Long resistant in the 8th century, it was finally subdued by Charlemagne, who bestowed it (less Gascony) as a kingdom upon his son Louis (the future emperor Louis I). It remained a kingdom under Louis's son Pippin I and the latter's son Pippin II, its chief towns being Toulouse, Limoges, and Poitiers. Devastation by the Normans in the 9th century resulted in political and social upheavals during the course of which various feudal domains were established.

The title of duke of Aquitaine, which had already been used by various little-known persons in the 7th century, was assumed at the end of the 9th by William I the Pious, count of Auvergne, the founder of the Abbey of Cluny. In the first half of the 10th century the counts of Auvergne, of Toulouse, and of Poitiers each claimed this ducal title, but it was eventually secured by William I, count of Poitiers (William III of Aquitaine). The powerful house of the counts of Poitiers retained Aquitaine during the 10th and 11th centuries, endeavouring from time to time to restore to the name its former significance by extending the boundaries of the duchy to include Gascony and Toulouse. Then, on the death without heirs of the last duke, William X (William VIII of Poitiers), in 1137, his daughter Eleanor united Aquitaine to the kingdom of France by her marriage with Louis VII. When Louis divorced her, however, Eleanor of Aquitaine married in 1152 the count of Anjou, Henry Plantagenet, who two years later became king of England as Henry II. The duchy thus passed to her new husband, who, having suppressed a revolt there, gave it to his son, Richard the Lion-Heart (later Richard I of England), who spent most of his life in Aquitaine, often subduing rebellious vassals. When Richard died in 1199, the duchy reverted to Eleanor, and, on her death five years later, it was united to the English crown and henceforward followed the fortunes of the English possessions in France.

Aquitaine, as it came to the English kings, stretched as of old from the Loire to the Pyrenees, but its extent was curtailed on the southeast by the wide lands of the counts of Toulouse. The name Guyenne (or Guienne), a corruption of Aquitaine, seems to have come into use about the 10th century, and the subsequent history of Aquitaine is merged in that of Gascony and Guyenne, which were completely reunited to France by the end of the Hundred Years' War.
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England, Shropshire, Whixall - Church records - IndexesEngland, Shropshire, Prees - Church records - Indexes          

John FETTY, Birth: Abt. 1490, Clerkenwell-London, England - Relatives:  Samuel MOORE 

John FETTY, Birth: Abt. 1510, England

JOHN FETTY, Marriage – 1548, Clerkenwell, London, England

Birth: 1549, Sex: F, England - Parents: Elizabeth FETTY and John FETTY 

Christening: 17 Aug 1625 - Saint Dunstan, Stepney, London, England -
Father: William FETTY 
  
Marriage: Josiah FETTY and Deborah WARD, 4 Feb 1801 - Blaby, Leicester,England
PERSECUTIONS IN ENGLAND DURING THE REIGN OF QUEEN MARY
CHAPTER XVI

John Fetty, of the parish of Clerkenwell, by trade a tailor, and only twenty-four years of age, abt: 1557.
Below are a Few references to Fetty in England
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